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Notebook: Kansas Women Maul Delaware State

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Happy Thanksgiving you filthy animals

Turkeys Raised On California Farm Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Kansas news

The loud emergence of quiet Lagerald Vick | KUsports.com
The very first day Kansas guard Lagerald Vick set foot on KU's campus, strength and conditioning director Andrea Hudy passed him in the hall of the Kansas basketball offices and greeted him with a simple, 'Hey, Lagerald, what's up?'”

'Just like money': Kylee Kopatich, Jayhawks dominate first half in blowout win vs. Delaware State | KUsports.com
“That’s like money for me,” said Kopatich following the Jayhawks' 81-49 demolition of Delaware State in Allen Fieldhouse.

Notebook: Mike Lee's status for finale at Oklahoma State uncertain | KUsports.com
An undisclosed injury Lee suffered in the Jayhawks’ Nov. 4 loss to Baylor has kept the hard-hitting defensive back from New Orleans out of the lineup since. Head coach David Beaty didn’t know at his weekly press conference whether Lee would be able to return to the field for Saturday’s season finale at No. 18 Oklahoma State (11 a.m. kickoff, FOX Sports 1).

Challenging junior season hasn't discouraged KU's Dorance Armstrong Jr. | KUsports.com
“It’s been challenging,” Armstrong admitted, a day after he and three teammates lost their captainship for the season finale because of KU's pre-game handshake snub of Mayfield. “It’s really just been another learning experience. I’ve learned a lot, become a better player since last year, and I’m thankful for that.”

Bill Self on KU’s 19 threes: ‘Hopefully we can do it when we really need to’
“We made a lot of shots last night,” Self, KU’s 15th-year coach said Wednesday night in answer to a question to open the show. The Jayhawks canned a school-record 19 threes in a school-record 36 attempts. “Hopefully we can do it when we really need to.”

Thanksgiving news

Thanksgiving in Space Means Turkey, Work and Football for Astronauts
After dinner, the astronauts will have cranberry-apple cobbler for dessert and maybe even watch a little football. As with many U.S. families on Earth, it is customary for astronauts to watch NFL games on Thanksgiving. "They have not communicated any specific plans to watch football [yet], but it will be available if requested per usual," Huot said.

Thanksgiving is a tradition. It's also a lie – LA Times
The first Thanksgiving I remember, I was in the second grade. I didn’t know my teacher had asked my dad to come talk to the class. When he walked in, I was embarrassed to see him there. He said that white people came and didn’t know how to survive on this land, so we helped them out, then celebrated with a meal. It was a story I’d heard in school before, but not at home.

‘This is not a trend.’ Native American chefs resist the ‘Columbusing’ of indigenous foods | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Thinking of Native American food as a trend perpetuates a number of misguided notions: first, that Native American food is a monolithic thing. The food of our country’s indigenous people - some, like Baca, do not like the term “Native American,” because his ancestors predate the naming of America - is as diverse as the country’s 567 federally recognized Native American nations. Outsiders tend to think of them in the aggregate, noting fry bread, a fried dough with various toppings, as one food that many share. Around Thanksgiving, one of the few times that schools teach students about Native Americans, many include fry bread as part of the curriculum.

Was Thanksgiving just a fanciful depiction? 5 myths about American Indians | NJ.com
But the new arrivals who sat down to share venison with some of America's original inhabitants relied on a raft of misconceptions that began as early as the 1500s, when Europeans produced fanciful depictions of the "New World." In the centuries that followed, captivity narratives, novels, short stories, textbooks, newspapers, art, photography, movies and television perpetuated old stereotypes or created new ones - particularly ones that cast indigenous peoples as obstacles to, rather than actors in, the creation of the modern world.

What Do We Owe Indigenous America?
In any case, whether you like us or not, we’re a part of your story—a prop, or a side note. But here’s the thing: You probably don’t come close to realizing the degree to which indigenous people suffered and sacrificed so that America could be what it is today. Even if you’re well meaning, you’re probably not as grateful as you should be.

What Native American Communities Are Facing This Thanksgiving - Carbonated.TV
Despite America’s whitewashed interpretation of a joyous meal shared between white Pilgrims and Native Americans, Thanksgiving is — at its core — a celebration of the invasion and genocide of indigenous peoples.

The Caucasian’s Guide to Black Thanksgiving, Part 1: The Guest List
It is impossible for one to fully understand Black Thanksgiving without knowing the cast of characters who will be present when we join together to break cornbread. The following is a list of people who will appear at all Black Thanksgivings.

The Caucasian’s Guide to Thanksgiving, Part 2: The Menu
Unlike white Thanksgivings, the turkey is one of the least important parts of Black Thanksgiving. It is a necessary ingredient because the turkey is what separates a Thanksgiving meal from a family reunion, a cookout or a post-funeral dinner. In fact, Black Thanksgiving ain’t nothing but an interior-based cookout with a turkey.